Sewer Discharges Of Industrial Wastewater

Evaluate the Industrial Wastewater 

In this paper, we continue our series on environmental engineering.  Specifically, we discuss acceptance of your plant’s sewer discharge by the off-site treatment plant.  Conversely, this is not about discharges to surface waters, on-site treatment facilities, or ground water.

How do you evaluate your industrial wastewater?  Firstly, perform a mass balance calculation.  To explain, identify and quantify all chemicals and materials.  Basically, mass balance means what goes in must go out.  Secondly, list the chemical properties.  Finally, determine if the discharge is acceptable. And that is very important.  Why?  Because the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA, www.epa.gov) requires it.  But the County usually enforces it.  How? By using a Sewer Use Ordinance. 

Why Worry about Sewer Discharges of Industrial Wastewater? 

There are good reasons to worry about your plant’s sewer discharge.  For starters, the discharge could be toxic.  As a result, it could kill micro-organisms at the treatment plant.  What’s more, the discharge might be flammable or explosive.  As a result, it could cause a fire or explosion at the plant.  Additionally, it could cause the plant’s discharge to pollute surface or ground water.  Finally, it could violate the Sewer Use Ordinance.  Consequently, your plant could get bad press and be fined.

Will They Know it is from Your Facility? 

The County can do sewer discharge tracing.  First, they inspect and test the wastewater at lift stations.  Second, they use the results to identify one lift station causing the problem.  Third, they determine which plants discharge to that lift station.  Fourth, they decide which plant is the most likely suspect.  Fourth, they knock on your door, ask questions, and test your discharge.  It is not that difficult.

Clean It Up 

So, before the County comes knocking, see if you need to clean up your wastewater.  First, read the Ordinance closely.  Second, determine if  banned chemicals could be in your discharge.  If so, test the discharge.  If the results confirm a problem, you are dead in the water, right?  No, now explore the following treatment options:

  • Change the process 
  • Substitute chemicals 
  • Remove hazardous wastes 
  • Pretreat the wastewater
  • Get input from environmental engineer or County 

Next, run a bench scale test on the wastewater after treatment.  Good results mean start the treatment.  Bad results mean you adjust the treatment, retest, and then start the treatment.

Environmental Safety ConsultantsSo, there is a discussion of the environmental engineering related to sewer discharges of industrial wastewater! If you need any assistance, ESC (www.escflorida.com) is here. We are a Florida licensed environmental engineering firm with a P.E. on staff. We have the credentials and experience to help you with your industrial wastewater sewer discharge needs. We are just a telephone call (800-226-1735) or an e-mail away (escinc@verizon.net). Contact us today!

Environmental Engineering for NPDES Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP)

Background 

So far, we have provided several papers on or related to environmental engineering, which is provided stormwater pollution by environmental consulting firms like ours, Environmental Safety Consultants, Inc. (ESC). We provided information on environmental permits, then went into an overview of environmental engineering. Next, we addressed industrial wastewater and, finally, air emissions control provided by an air engineer. There was also a paper discussing Florida NPDES (National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System) Industrial Stormwater requirements. Now we will discuss the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP).

Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP)

The current paper will discuss environmental engineering required for an SWPPP (Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan). The regulatory requirements are provided by both the U.S. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency, www.epa.gov) and the FDEP (Florida Department of Environmental Protection, www.floridadep.gov). The requirements discussed herein primarily cover manufacturing and industrial facilities with SIC (Standard Industrial Classification) Codes 21 – 39 with specific exposure to stormwater. 

Objective 

The objective of the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan is self-evident from its name. That is, the SWPPP is prepared by an environmental engineer to prevent pollution of stormwater so it does not discharge and impact receiving waters. Why? Because if it does, it can impair the biological organisms and public health. 

Components of Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan

In preparing the SWPPP, the environmental engineer first identifies the facility and describes its operations, location, and receiving surface waters. Then, information and data are gathered in the following areas to assess the facility’s impact to stormwater: 

  • Topography, runoff, & discharge point(s) 
  • Material inventory, quantities, & exposure 
  • Significant spills or leaks last three years 
  • Non-stormwater discharges
  • Pollutant sources & specific parameters 
  • Best Management Practices (BMPs) to control pollutants 

Based on the results of the preceding, the environmental engineer discusses the findings with the client, then prepares the SWPPP and submits it for review. It is important that the client be able to implement and use the plan to reduce or eliminate pollutants in the facility’s stormwater runoff. 

Implementation 

The client’s management must endorse the SWPPP and sign it as documentation. A Pollution Prevention Team is formed and identified in the SWPPP. Team members and other personnel receive training. Resources are committed to attain the plan’s objective by implementing the BMPs selected. Visual monitoring of the stormwater discharge is required quarterly and laboratory analysis may be required during the second and fourth years of the five year permit. All records are kept in the SWPPP and, thus, it is a living document. 

Environmental Safety ConsultantsSo there is a discussion of the preparation of an SWPPP by an environmental engineer! If you need any assistance, Environmental Safety Consultants (www.escflorida.com) is here. We are a Florida licensed environmental consulting and Florida licensed environmental engineering firm with a P.E. on staff. We have the credentials and experience to help you with your SWPPP. We are just a telephone call (800- 226-1735) or an e-mail away (escinc@verizon.net). Contact us today!

Environmental Engineering for Air Emissions

Background 

In three previous papers we dealt with an overview of environmental engineering, industrial wastewater permits, and industrial wastewater environmental engineering. In this paper, we will discuss environmental engineering required to address air emissions to the outside environment. Environmental engineering for air emissionsThese emissions result from manufacturing and industrial operations. They may be from a point source such as a smoke stack or from a non-point source and are called fugitive emissions. The latter result from processes typically inside a building or in an outside designated area. Environmental engineering is required to determine the best reasonably achievable control technology to minimize the emissions to the environment outside of the facility. The environmental air engineer must be involved in the design, testing, and adjusting the controls. Applications for Title V Air permits and Federally Enforceable State Operating Permits (FESOPs) must be signed and sealed by a Florida licensed Professional Engineer (P.E.). A P.E. in Florida is only allowed to practice in areas that he or she has the required education, training, and experience. Thus, the P.E. must be an environmental engineer with air emissions knowledge and experience and is quite often called the Air Engineer and is usually with an Environmental Consulting firm such as ours, Environmental Safety Consultants, Inc. 

Start with the Pollutants 

To engineer the air emissions controls, you have to know the process generating the emissions. The environmental engineer must review the raw materials, the industrial or manufacturing process, the resultant air emissions, and the control options. Following are a few pollutants which may be of concern: 

  • Particulate Matter (physical particles or dust) 
  • Nitrogen Oxides 
  • Sulfur Dioxide 
  • Carbon Monoxide 
  • Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) 
  • Ozone 
  • Lead 

All of these except VOCs are criteria air pollutants established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA, https://www.epa.gov/criteria-air-pollutants).  Each type of pollutant may require a different environmental engineering design to remove or reduce it before being emitted to the outside environment.

Clean It Up 

The goal is to clean up the air so the pollutants are eliminated or below State standards prior to emission. These standards are thresholds for public health concerns. If the pollutants are below these criteria, there is not a public health concern, but there still may be a concern for unborn babies (pregnant women), children, the elderly, and individuals with certain lung conditions, such as emphysema, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), etcetera. 

Control Design 

The control design is selected to address the pollutants. Following are a few examples: 

  • Alternative raw materials 
  • Industrial process modifications 
  • Filters (cloth, baghouses) 
  • Cyclones (gravitational) 
  • Air scrubbers 
  • Precipitators (electrostatic) 
  • Equipment maintenance and cleaning 

Role of the Environmental Air Engineer

First, the environmental engineer reviews the industrial process, including materials and chemicals, generating the air emissions. The engineer then evaluates several control design options and runs calculations to determine which one will work best and will be cost-effective. He or she then prepares the air permit application; submits it to FDEP and, if required, to the County; provides additional information requested by the FDEP and County; reviews the permit making sure that it meets good engineering practice and is manageable for the client; and, if requested, monitors the treatment process in light of the permit conditions. 

Environmental Safety ConsultantsSo there is a discussion of air emissions environmental engineering and what the environmental engineer’s role is! If you need any assistance, Environmental Safety Consultants (www.escflorida.com) is here. We are a Florida licensed environmental engineering company with a P.E. on staff. We have the credentials and experience to help you with your industrial wastewater needs. We are just a telephone call (800-226-1735) or an e-mail away (escinc@verizon.net). Contact us today!

Environmental Engineering For Industrial Wastewater

Background

In two previous papers we dealt with an overview of environmental engineering and industrial wastewater permits. In this paper, we will discuss environmental engineering required to address ESC - Environmental Engineering for Industrial Waste Waterindustrial wastewater. This is the engineering required to treat the wastewater so it does not pollute the receiving surface water, or so it is within tolerable limits and virtually has no impact. Environmental engineering is required to determine the best reasonably achievable control technology to do so. The environmental engineer must be involved in the design, testing, and adjusting the treatment process. Florida NPDES Industrial Wastewater permit applications must be signed and sealed by a Florida licensed Professional Engineer (P.E.). A P.E. in Florida is only allowed to practice in areas that he or she has the required education, training, and experience. Thus, the P.E. must be an environmental engineer with industrial wastewater knowledge and experience.

Start with the Pollutants

To engineer the treatment, you have to know the waste stream. The environmental engineer must become familiar with the industrial materials and processes generating the wastewater. Following are a few pollutants which may be of concern:

  • Heat (thermal)
  • Nutrients (phosphorus and nitrogen)
  • Biochemical Oxygen Demand (e.g., organic matter)
  • Heavy Metals
  • Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)
  • Radioactivity
  • Particulates resulting in Turbidity

Each type of pollutant may require a different environmental engineering design to remove or reduce it in the wastewater before discharge.

Clean It Up

The goal is to clean up the wastewater so the pollution is below State standards prior to discharge. Mixing zones can be approved where the concentration is above the standard at the point of discharge but is allowed to mix with the receiving water and must be below the State standards so many feet downstream. Approval of such mixing zones by the FDEP (Florida Department of Environmental Protection, www.floridadep.gov) is possible, but not likely. There has to be a very good reason why the State standard cannot be met at the point of discharge.

Treatment Design

The treatment design is selected to address the pollutants. Following are a few examples:

  • Cooling of heated (thermal) effluent
  • Primary and secondary settling of particulates in pond or tank
  • Aeration to encourage biota to degrade organic matter
  • Chemical additives to oxidize or coagulate select pollutants
  • Percolation to allow filtration in soil column
  • Filtration with various types of filters

Role of the Environmental Engineer

First, the environmental engineer reviews the industrial process, including materials and chemicals, generating the industrial wastewater. The engineer then evaluates several treatment design options and runs calculations to determine which one will work best and will be cost-effective. He or she then prepares the permit application; submits it to FDEP and, if required, to the County; provides additional information requested by the FDEP and County; reviews the permit making sure that it meets good engineering practice; and, if requested, monitors the treatment process in light of the permit conditions.

So there is a discussion of industrial wastewater environmental engineering and what the environmental engineer’s role is! If you need any assistance, Environmental Safety Consultants
(www.escflorida.com) is here. We are a Florida licensed environmental engineering company with a P.E. on staff. We have the credentials and experience to help you with your industrial wastewater needs.

We are just a telephone call (800-226-1735) or an e-mail away (escinc@verizon.net). Contact us today!

What Is Environmental Engineering?

Term Defined

Quite often we are asked, “So what is environmental engineering? Do you pick up litter?” To which you probably know the answer to the second question is a definite “NO!!!”, but may not so definitely know the answer to the first question. According to Britannica (https://www.britannica.com), environmental engineering is “the development of processes and infrastructure for the supply of water, the disposal of waste, and the control of pollution of all kinds. These endeavours protect public health by preventing disease transmission, and they preserve the quality of the environment by averting the contamination and degradation of air, water, and land resources.”

According to Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org), “Environmental engineering is a professional engineering discipline that takes from broad scientific topics like chemistry, biology, ecology, geology, hydraulics, hydrology, microbiology, and mathematics to create solutions that will protect and also improve the health of living organisms and improve the quality of the environment.” This definition is very similar to the one above. And both accurately define environmental engineering.

But Really, What is Environmental Engineering?

What is Environmental EngineeringThat is the million dollar question. But the history of the discipline will help answer it. For years and years, environmental engineering was known as sanitary engineering and was part of the civil engineering field. However, it came into its own being in the mid-1960’s with the recognition of pollution on our planet and the outcries to clean it up. Scientists and engineers came to the forefront to assist. Technical expertise was needed with water pollution, air pollution, and land pollution. Landmark federal laws were passed – the Clean Water Act (1972), the Clean Air Act (1970), and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, & Liability Act (1980).Don’t worry, this is not a boring paper on detailed regulations! Those     federal laws were only mentioned to identify the three main areas of environmental engineering and to demonstrate how loud the outcry was to clean up the  environment. It is extremely impressive that the U.S. Congress passed these laws so quickly! And what they did was create the need for environmental regulations, permits, and agencies to accomplish the mission.

Agencies, you ask? Let’s start at the top – the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (https://www.epa.gov) came out of Reorganization Plan No. 3 calling for the establishment of that agency. That was an executive order which President Richard M. Nixon signed on July 9, 1970. The EPA began operation on December 2, 1970. Wow, things seemed to move quickly fifty years ago!

Once the EPA began publishing regulations to clean up the environment, they worked in cooperation with states to form departments or to use existing departments to implement the regulations. And so state environmental departments formed to clean up the environment across each state. Pollution control departments and divisions were formed at county and city levels.

Existing health departments were tapped. Funding came down from EPA and it was often tied to the construction of wastewater treatment plants which are a huge expense that no county or city can afford on its own. If the states did not enforce the mandated environmental regulations, EPA would cut funding. And that meant jobs, worsening pollution, and outcries from the public. So there were incentives to comply.

Birth of the Environmental Engineer

Formerly known as civil or sanitary engineers, environmental engineers came to the forefront to assist the various governmental entities and the private sector with implementation of and compliance with the environmental regulations.

Environmental scientists and engineers began working together both in the government and private sectors. Their job? Ultimately, their job was to clean up the environment through the design of processes, equipment, and testing in the areas of water, air, and land. And they are still at it today!

Further Assistance

If you need any help, Environmental Safety Consultants (www.escflorida.com) is here.  We are a Florida licensed environmental engineering company with a Florida licensed Professional Engineer and Environmental Scientists on staff. We have been completing environmental engineering and science projects since 1986. We have the credentials and experience to help you complete your Environmental Site Assessment project.

We are just a telephone call (800-226-1735) or an e-mail away (escinc@verizon.net).  Contact us today!

Environmental Permits Overview

Environmental Permits Overview: What do You Mean Environmental Permits?

Environmental Permits OverviewThere are a lot of different kinds of environmental permits.  Here are just a few:

  • Wetlands
  • Endangered Species
  • Air Permits for Air Discharges from Industry
  • Wastewater Discharge, Sanitary and Industrial
  • Stormwater, Retention Ponds, Detention Ponds, Stormwater Runoff – Construction and Industry
  • Septic Tanks
  • Drinking Water, Private Wells and Community Supplies
  • Solid Wastes, Landfills & Incineration
  • Hazardous Wastes, Transportation, Disposal & Storage

Who Gets the Permit?

The list is as long as the types of permits.  It can include developers, builders, banks, attorneys, manufacturers, industrial facilities, hospitals, crematories, municipalities, and many more!

Do You Need a Permit?

You have to review your planned operation to see if it will require an environmental permit.  Second, you have to decide what part of the environment it may impact.  Will it impact air, water, or land?  Will it be changing the existing site?

For example, if you are going to construct a building and pave the site, it will decrease percolation of rain water into the ground.  More water will run off the site.  You will increase stormwater runoff.  You will have to address how this will be handled before you build.  You will need a stormwater pond permit and an NPDES  permit for industrial sites, along with a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP).

Another example is if you are building an industrial facility.  You may have to look into stormwater runoff, NPDES (industrial wastewater discharges and stormwater), air permit requirements.  You may also face requirements for used oil and hazardous waste.

The Players

Who do you call?  Your associates and their knowledge base can be a good starting point.  That includes your attorney, professional colleagues, and environmental engineering companies.  They may direct you to agencies or contact the agencies themselves on your behalf.

There are several key agencies which typically administer the various types of environmental permits.  Locally, these include the Water Management Districts, Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), counties, and cities.  And, at the federal level, they include the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA, www.epa.gov) and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.  All of them have web sites and are generally helpful.  Just be careful what you say.  It is all in the presentation!

ESC Environmental Permits Overview So there is an overview of Environmental Permits!  If you need any assistance, Environmental Safety Consultants (www.escflorida.com) is here.  We are a Florida licensed environmental engineering company.  We have the credentials and experience to help you get your permit.  We have a proven track record with a Florida licensed environmental engineer and environmental scientists on staff.  We specialize in air permits, industrial discharge permits, NPDES stormwater, and more.  We are just a telephone call (800-226-1735) or an e-mail away (escinc@verizon.net).  Contact us today!